I don’t know about you, but whenever I put a lot of effort into something, I usually experience a bit of a down time when it is all over. I’ve been thinking a lot about Ms. Brown and Ms. Albaugh and the drama kids this week. They’ve been working toward this weekend’s musical performances for months now. I’m sure they are tired, but when it is over, there will probably be a void in their life and they will need to figure out how to fill that time.

At many of the prior schools where I have worked, I was the drama director. For two months I would throw myself into the show, giving everything that I had to the production. I would have rehearsals every day after school and spend at least eight hours every Saturday helping to build the set. It was both draining and exhilarating at the same time. As I would sit in the back of the auditorium watching the show, I would begin to feel a sense of loss, for I knew that it was about to end.

In some ways, completing the Re-Accreditation project is a bit like this. For the entire time that I’ve been at ICSV, I’ve been working toward the Re-Accreditation visit. So now that it’s over, there’s the question of “what’s next?” When Brian Williams asked me to share in staff devotions this week, I was drawn to the book of I Kings, chapters 17, 18 and 19. In these chapters, we read about how the prophet Elijah boldly stood up for God and against the false prophets of Baal and Asherah. He experienced God’s provision with numerous miracles, like when the ravens brought him bread and meat, and when the widow’s oil and flour did not run out. He even restored her son’s life after he had died.

You may remember how he challenged the false prophets on Mount Carmel when he poured water all over his altar and the sacrificed bull, and God consumed it all with fire that fell from heaven. God used him mightily through all of this, and then as soon as Jezebel threatened to kill him, he ran away and asked God to take his life. What happened to the bold prophet who had just killed 850 false prophets? He was emotionally spent and physically exhausted. So God provided him with food and a time of sleep. Once he was refreshed, Elijah went on to anoint the new king of Syria and the new king over Israel. He mentored Elisha, the prophet that would take his place when Elijah had completed that which God had asked him to do.

What I found so encouraging is that once Elijah had a time of rest, God asked him to stand on the mountain where he experienced a great wind, an earthquake, and a fire. The Bible tells us that he did not find God in any of these huge events. Instead, he found God in “a still small voice” that has been described as a voice of low whispers or a sound of gentle stillness. After all the huge successes that Elijah had experienced as he served God, he also needed to hear God’s voice in the quiet times, when everything was still and just kind of “normal.” So now that the school musical is coming to an end and our time of preparing for the Re-Accreditation visit is over, I pray that we will take the time to rest and to wait on the Lord. Sometimes we are just so busy that we can’t hear His still small voice. May this time leading up to Palm Sunday, Good Friday, and Easter be a time of rest and waiting on God. As we are reminded in Psalm 46: “Be still, and know that I am God.”

Because of His Faithfulness,
Sharon Brobst, Ed.D.
Director